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Grow Your Own Drugs

bbc-logoDer Begriff »Drugs« meint im Eng­li­sche kei­ne Dro­gen, son­dern Arz­nei­en. Im kon­kre­ten Fall sind es phar­ma­ko­lo­gisch schwach wirk­sa­me Mit­tel, die aus Pflan­zen, die selbst ange­baut wer­den kön­nen, gewon­nen wer­den.

Staf­fel 1, BBC, 2010

Unleash the power of plants and soot­he the sym­ptoms of ever­y­day ail­ments the natu­ral way. Whe­ther you’re struggling with insom­nia, the kids have ecze­ma, or your part­ner is fee­ling under the wea­ther, this series could have the ans­wer. With easy reci­pes eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong shows how to make simp­le creams, sal­ves, teas and much, much more from the stuff gro­wing in your win­dow box, the local gar­den cent­re or in the hedge­rows. Using the flowers, fruit, vege­ta­bles, roots, trees and herbs that are all around us James pro­vi­des pre­pa­ra­ti­ons to help relie­ve a who­le ran­ge of com­mon con­di­ti­ons, inclu­ding acne, anxie­ty, cold sores and gene­ral aches and pains – plus gre­at ide­as for beau­ty fixes such as bath bombs and sham­poos.

  1. Fruit · In this ope­ning epi­so­de, James reveals that the­re is more to some fruit than just the nut­ri­tio­nal value. He uses figs to relie­ve con­s­ti­pa­ti­on, hops for a good night’s sleep, turns kiwis and papa­yas into a soot­hing face mask and uses goji ber­ries in a soup that could help feed a cold – and all from things that might be found in any fruit bowl. James tri­es out his reme­di­es on mem­bers of the public, with some sur­pri­sing results.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  2. Flowers · In the second epi­so­de of this six-part series explo­ring plant-based natu­ral reme­di­es and beau­ty tre­at­ments, eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong turns the spot­light on flowers. He reveals the his­to­ri­cal use of mari­golds, vio­las and elder­flowers as ways to help relie­ve the sym­ptoms of ever­y­day ail­ments such as sore throats, acne and ecze­ma. Suf­fe­rers of each of the­se, who are keen to find a natu­ral solu­ti­on to their health pro­blems, try out James’s reme­di­es.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  3. Trees · Third epi­so­de of the six-part series explo­ring plant-based natu­ral reme­di­es and beau­ty tre­at­ments. Eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong focu­ses on trees. His reci­pes for natu­ral tree reme­di­es inclu­de a soot­hing gel for vari­co­se veins made from con­kers, a fra­grant colo­gne made from pine, a lotion to tack­le head lice and a tra­di­tio­nal tea which could help impro­ve memo­ry func­tion. It is a fasci­na­ting mix of gar­de­ning, sci­ence and histo­ry, and the vol­un­te­ers who try James’s reme­di­es find out if they can actual­ly help.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  4. Herbs · Most peop­le use herbs to give food a bit of extra tas­te and fla­vour, but in this epi­so­de, eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong explo­res their more tra­di­tio­nal use in hel­ping tre­at a ran­ge of minor ever­y­day ail­ments, from cold sores and insect bites to bad bre­ath. Suf­fe­rers try them out to see if the­se natu­ral reme­di­es help relie­ve their sym­ptoms. James also uses pep­per­mint to whip up a fra­grant home­ma­de body scrub.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  5. Roots · James Wong focu­ses on what he con­s­i­ders the unsung heroes of the plant world – roots. Using vale­ri­an, gin­ger and mar­sh­mal­low he crea­tes tas­ty tre­ats to help com­bat stress, soot­he coughs and relie­ve nau­sea and reveals the tra­di­tio­nal uses of echi­n­acea to fight off infec­tion.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  6. Vege­ta­bles · Eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong shows view­ers how to grow and trans­form com­mon vege­ta­bles into tre­at­ments which might help ease mus­cle sprains and make a gre­at addi­ti­on to a low cho­le­ste­rol diet. James also turns cucum­bers into a soot­hing eye gel for suf­fe­rers to try.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on

Grow Your Own Drugs for Christ­mas


Staf­fel 2, BBC, 2011

Eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong returns with ano­t­her series packed full of inspi­ring natu­ral reme­di­es for minor ever­y­day ail­ments, plus a few luxu­rious beau­ty tre­ats to make you look and feel won­der­ful. James wants us to see bey­ond the orna­men­tal value of fami­li­ar plants and appre­cia­te the role they can play in taking care of our health, and offers hor­ti­cul­tu­ral tips on the best plant varie­ties to select and how to grow and har­vest them.

  1. Gar­den Herbs · In this ope­ning epi­so­de, James sets out to reinvent our per­cep­ti­on of com­mon and gar­den herbs. His simp­le, cheap but high­ly ori­gi­nal reci­pes inclu­de an ange­li­ca sto­mach soot­her for indi­ges­ti­on, fra­grant anti-dan­d­ruff hair oil, and an insec­tici­dal worm­wood and sage repel­lent to help banish the pes­ky clo­thes moth. Mem­bers of the public try James’s reme­di­es and are often sur­pri­sed by the results.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  2. Incredi­ble Edi­bles · In the second epi­so­de of eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong’s series about plant based medi­ci­ne, he chal­len­ges us to look at the medi­c­inal and not just the nut­ri­tio­nal value of some of the food we eat. In a fasci­na­ting blend of gar­de­ning, coo­ke­ry, sci­ence and histo­ry, James shows us how to use tur­me­ric to help ease mus­cu­lar aches and pains, whips up a mois­tu­ri­sing body cream from some­thing you would nor­mal­ly have for bre­ak­fast, invi­tes two wil­ling mem­bers of the public to try his pun­gent oni­on garg­le for their recur­ring sore throats, and shows how to grow water­cress on your kit­chen work top and trans­form it in to a mouth wate­ring and vit­amin packed soup, ide­al if you’re a bit ana­emic.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  3. Exotic Plants · Eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong inves­ti­ga­tes plant-based medi­ci­ne. Alt­hough his natu­ral reme­di­es for ever­y­day minor ail­ments fre­quent­ly use plants that we would con­si­der to be exotic, many of the­se will grow real­ly well in our own back gar­dens. James shows us how to use lemon­grass in an insect repel­lent spray, trans­form oli­ve lea­ves into a pam­pe­ring face mask, make a soot­hing burns tre­at­ment from aloe vera and cha­mo­mi­le and, perhaps most sur­pri­sin­gly of all, reveals that, not only can you grow tea bus­hes in this coun­try, you can also turn them into a zin­gy mou­th­wash to help fight plaque and fres­hen bre­ath. Mem­bers of the public, in need of help, give his reme­di­es and beau­ty tre­at­ments a go.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  4. Petals · Eth­no­bo­ta­nist James Wong belie­ves plants have more uses than just brigh­ten­ing up a flower bor­der. They con­tain bene­fi­ci­al pro­per­ties that could help ease the sym­ptoms of minor ever­y­day health com­p­laints. James focu­ses on petals, tur­ning cha­mo­mi­le into a luxu­rious bath milk and honey­suck­le and jas­mi­ne into soot­hing jel­lies for sore throats. Mem­bers of the public are impres­sed by his ear drops made from mul­lein flowers, while James puts his money whe­re his mouth is and bra­vely tri­es out his own rose petal leg waxing tre­at­ment. He shows us how to make a cha­mo­mi­le seat and sniffs out the most fra­grant rose varie­ties. His reci­pes are simp­le to fol­low and cheap to make, and might just soot­he your sym­ptoms if you’re in need of help.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  5. Shrubs and Trees · In the pen­ul­ti­ma­te epi­so­de of his eth­no­bo­ta­ni­cal gui­de to the medi­c­inal pro­per­ty of plants, James Wong uses trees and shrubs to tack­le minor ever­y­day com­p­laints. He shows one shaving rash suf­fe­rer how to grow witch hazel and turn it into a coo­ling gel, and offers three sinu­si­tis suf­fe­rers some reli­ef with a fra­grant euca­lyp­tus rub that takes just moments to make. He meets expert gro­wers and turns St John’s Wort into a skin balm for cuts and wounds, and crea­tes a deli­cious loo­king fro­zen gra­ni­ta from wil­low bark to help pro­vi­de pain reli­ef.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on
  6. Wild Plants · It’s the end of James Wong’s eth­no­bo­ta­ni­cal jour­ney, and he rounds his series off with a look at the plants that have pro­vi­ded a free living phar­ma­cy for thousands of years: wild plants. Taking care to point out the perils of picking in the wild, James tra­vels to Nort­hern Ire­land, whe­re he har­vests sea­weed for a luxu­rious sea­weed body scrub, fora­ges for elder­ber­ries and turns them into an anti-viral jam to help ward off colds and flu, and tri­es to offer hay­fe­ver suf­fe­rers some reli­ef with his nett­le tea. He also seeks out a tiny wild flower cal­led eye­b­right, and uses it to make a com­press to soot­he tired and itchy eyes. For the green-fin­ge­red, James demons­tra­tes how you can make your own mini wild flower mea­dow in a tiny back gar­den, and offers some his­to­ri­cal and sci­en­ti­fic back­ground to the plants he uses.
    ⇒ Video on Dai­l­y­mo­ti­on

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